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UKIP generates great sound bites

by on 12 Mar, 2014

Political communications can be brutal.  See the career of Alastair Campbell. And watch the antics of Malcolm Tucker played by Peter Capaldi in the TV series The Thick of it.

People’s Princess

But occasionally it comes up with some glorious phrases, or rather sound bites.  Remember Tony Blair’s description of Diana as the “people’s Princess”? Great alliteration.

UKIP is the moving force in UK politics today.  It is generating plenty of political communications.   The PM called them “fruitcakes and loonies”.  Quite good until UKIP  served fruitcake at its spring conference.

Today’s coverage of UKIP has come up with two excellent sound bites.

Candyfloss

A Number 10 source described UKIP: “It’s like candyfloss – a sticky mess that easily dissolves leaving a horrible aftertaste.”  Excellent imagery.

Excellent image with which to attack UKIP

Excellent image with which to attack UKIP

A nation of shop keepers

Then a Tory Euro-sceptic source countered: “If I was a shopkeeper and I began to notice that shoppers kept walking past my shop and on to another one that had recently opened, I wouldn’t stand at the door and shout abuse at my former customers.  I would find out why they were going to the other shop.  If it was because they preferred their stock, I would fire our purchasing manager and get new stock that they wanted.”

This is a longer sound bite than usual.  But it works.   The allusion to a shopkeeper reminds the Tory faithful of Margaret Thatcher.  And it puts the heads of the Tory party in the firing line.

Conjure up a picture

The lesson from all of these: conjure up a picture in your mind and use the images to communicate in this brutal world of political communication.

Have a go at our Caption Competition and win a free e-learning course of your choice!

Pic credit: photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/bitchbuzz/3934779149/”>BitchBuzz</a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a

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